News

Scotty James and Kelly Clark Win Olympic Test Event in Pyeongchang

February 21, 2017 By TransWorld SNOWboarding

Kelly Clark

Kelly Clark

BOKWANG PHOENIX PARK, South Korea (Feb. 19, 2017) – Kelly Clark (West Dover, VT) celebrated her second-consecutive World Cup triumph with a win at the official test event for the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Games. Shaun White (Carlsbad, CA) also hit his second podium of the year, with a second-place finish at the final World Cup halfpipe event of the year. Chloe Kim (Torrance, CA), who won the first two World Cup events of the season, claimed the crystal globe award as the overall FIS tour winner.

Clark, who is a four-time Olympian and three-time medalist (one gold, two bronze), won the official Olympic test event for the fourth consecutive time after also earning the top spot at Bardonecchia, Italy in 2005, Cypress Mountain, Canada in 2009 and Sochi, Russia in 2013. Clark edged Chinese riders Jiayu Liu and Xuetong Cai who finished second and third respectively.

“I’m thankful to put down the run I did today,” Clark said after the event. “I’m stoked on my snowboarding and even more stoked to end up on top of the podium.” Read more at http://snowboarding.transworld.net/news/scotty-james-kelly-clark-win-olympic-test-event-pyeongchang/#IOHyPVpUBIUsLgfy.99

“I’m thankful to put down the run I did today,” Clark said after the event. “I’m stoked on my snowboarding and even more stoked to end up on top of the podium.”
Read more at http://snowboarding.transworld.net/news/scotty-james-kelly-clark-win-olympic-test-event-pyeongchang/#IOHyPVpUBIUsLgfy.99

Kim finished fourth on Saturday, while Maddie Mastro (Wrightwood, CA) also made the final, finishing sixth.

On the men’s side, White was leading the event until the third and final run, when Scotty James of Australia put down a run that edged the the two-time Olympic gold medalist from Southern California. China’s Yiwei Zhang took the final podium spot with third.

Shaun White

Shaun White

Ben Ferguson (Bend, OR) and Greg Bretz (Mammoth Lakes, CA) both barely missed the podium, finishing fourth and fifth respectively. Chase Josey (Hailey, ID) was sixth and Matt Ladley (Steamboat Springs, CO) was seventh.

QUOTES

Kelly Clark – First Place, Women

This is a huge step for me in my process just coming back from my hip surgery to get my riding back to a really high level. Since last week, I finally feel that I’m back to where I was before I got injured. I have hoped that I can build. It’s awesome to be at a test event knowing that I have a whole year to progress.

I’m thankful to put down the run I did today, and I’m stoked on my snowboarding and even more stoked to end up on top of the podium. In practice I did some cleaner runs. In my first run, I landed flat a couple of times and under-rotated a few things. It was good to get one under my belt but I knew I could do it cleaner. That was my whole approach: land higher on those walls, hang under those grabs longer because I know that execution is important at those events. That was what I really was trying to do.

Shaun White – Second Place, Men

It’s extremely disappointing. I absolutely came here to win and do my thing. It was a great test run for the Olympics. Yeah, I think (the) lesson is learned. The truth is…I am really tired. By the time I got to my last hit my back leg kinda gave out. So, I’m just disappointed in myself.

HIGHLIGHTS

•The final stop of the FIS World Cup halfpipe tour was also the official Olympic test event for the 2018 Olympic Games.

•Kelly Clark won for the women. It was her 13th career World Cup win and fourth Olympic test event win. Her run scored 94.00: frontside air, backside air, frontside 1080 indy, corked Cab 720, crippler indy.

•Shaun White was second for the men. His run scored 95.00: backside air, frontside double cork 1080, Cab double cork 1080, frontside 900, backside double cork 1260.

•Chloe Kim was fourth. She claimed the overall tour win, earning the crystal globe.

Results

Men

1. Scotty JAMES

2. Shaun WHITE

3. Yiwei ZHANG

4. Ben FERGUSON

5. Gregory BRETZ

6. Chase JOSEY

7. Matthew LADLEY

8. KentCALLISTER

Women: 

1. Kelly CLARK

2. Jiayu LIU

3. Xuetong CAI

4. Chloe KIM

5. Kurumi IMAI


Read more at snowboarding.transworld.net
 

 

Kelly Clark &long,halfpipe road to Olympics No.5

By EDDIE PELLS  Mar. 11, 2017 12:17 PM EST

FILE - In this March 1, 2015, file photo, Kelly Clark, of the United States, poses for a photograph after competing in a World Cup halfpipe snowboard even, in Park City, Utah. Clark, with her gold medal and two bronze that she values every bit as much, has nothing left to prove, this is the road she was willing to travel to make sure she leaves the competitive side of her sport on her terms, not on anyone else's. The 33-year-old snowboarding icon is willing to try for a fifth trip to the Olympic halfpipe. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

FILE - In this March 1, 2015, file photo, Kelly Clark, of the United States, poses for a photograph after competing in a World Cup halfpipe snowboard even, in Park City, Utah. Clark, with her gold medal and two bronze that she values every bit as much, has nothing left to prove, this is the road she was willing to travel to make sure she leaves the competitive side of her sport on her terms, not on anyone else's. The 33-year-old snowboarding icon is willing to try for a fifth trip to the Olympic halfpipe. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

VAIL, Colo. (AP) — For the better part of a month, Kelly Clark needed help for everything. She wasn't allowed to sit up straight, and her feet were bound together to avoid compromising tissue around her newly repaired hip that needed rest and plenty of hard work to become functional again.

This is the price the 33-year-old snowboarding icon was willing to pay to go for a fifth trip to the Olympic halfpipe.

And though Clark — with her gold medal and the two bronze medals that she values every bit as much — has nothing left to prove to anyone but herself, this is the road she was willing to travel to make sure she leaves the competitive side of her sport on her terms.

"A very limiting, humbling experience," Clark called the seven-month repair-rehab-and-recovery process that began with surgery last March. Among the fixes: Repair the labrum — the cartilage around the hip socket that holds the leg — and reattach part of the hamstring tendon that had torn away from the bone.

"I had to reevaluate what success looks like," Clark said. "If I kept the same measure of success of, 'I'm this amazing athlete,' — well, I was not an amazing athlete. I was a person who needed a lot of help to get through the day, whether it was emotionally, mentally or physically."

Nobody inside the snowboarding world would be surprised if Clark does what no snowboarder has done and makes a fifth Olympic team. And nobody would be surprised if she's at the top of the podium in the mountains of Korea next February: After getting healthy, Clark returned this season to win an Olympic test event in Korea and a U.S. Grand Prix contest at Mammoth Mountain, California.

But in a year where the bulk of the attention has gone to Chloe Kim, the 16-year-old phenom whose parents are from South Korea, Clark has stayed somewhat under the radar. Her reaction to the Kim sensation: "I was a (teenager) at one point, too."

As Clark puts it, she was snowboarding before snowboarding was cool . Before it was an Olympic sport and before most resorts even allowed the then-renegades on the mountain.

At 18, Clark helped change all that, coming into her own in the 2001-02 season by winning the last two Olympic qualifiers, the Winter X Games, the Olympics and the U.S. Open. Her victory at the Salt Lake City Games, which came about 24 hours before the U.S. men swept the medals on the halfpipe, officially put snowboarding on the map.

Her prescient comments from that day: "Maybe it will shine a light on snowboarding, and people will look at it in a different way."

Snowboarding hasn't been the same since then and, in a way, the journey Clark has taken from her home in West Dover, Vermont, through the upper echelons of the sport has included many of the same growing pains.

"She didn't seem to be getting any fulfillment or joy out of it," said longtime U.S. halfpipe coach Rick Bower, speaking about the period between 2003-06, when Clark struggled to adjust to life as an Olympic champion. "It seemed like she was going through the motions. I kept wondering, does she want to keep doing this?"

Clark had a winning run going at the 2006 Turin Games before falling on her last jump — a slip-up that left her in fourth place behind Americans Hannah Teter and Gretchen Bleiler, along with Kjersti Buaas of Norway. Certainly, the next generation of snowboarders had caught up and passed the 2002 champion.

But no.

Clark finished third at the next two Olympics and, in between those games, put together a 16-contest winning streak, the likes of which may never been seen again on the halfpipe.

For all those victories, though, she insists the Olympic bronze medals were as meaningful as any win "because you value things based on what they cost you."

On a mushy halfpipe in Vancouver, Clark closed with a frontside 900 jump on her second and final opportunity after falling hard and hurting her wrist on the same jump in the previous run. "She was definitely scared and crying and feeling pressure immensely," Bower said. "To be able to put a run down under those circumstances and get on the podium, it was pretty cool."

On an equally poor halfpipe in Sochi, she won bronze after falling six straight times — five during practice runs, then once in competition.

"I could have just said, 'It's over, thanks for coming,'" Clark said. "But when I look back at that performance, it was what I personally overcame that night that made it such a victory."

So, it makes perfect sense that a gold medal in Korea isn't what's motivating Clark these days.

She overcame the difficult hip surgery to give herself a chance in 2018 and ensure she wouldn't be bailing out of the sport for health reasons.

And 15 years after making the halfpipe part of the mainstream conversation in American sports, she has remained a central part of that conversation.

"If it was only about winning things, I probably should've stopped a long time ago," Clark said. "The motivators change over the years. But I think I still have something left to contribute, and I haven't hit my potential, and that's why I'm still here."

Click Here to be Taken to the AP orginal artical. 

 

Steadman Philippon Research Institute - OCTOBER ENEWS

A Snowboarding Legend: How Kelly Clark Became the Most Dominant Athlete in the History of the Sport

By Jim Brown

Kelly Clark, all five feet, four inches of her, is already a snowboarding legend—a four-time Olympian with one gold and two bronze medals. She has seven X Games gold medals, five World Snowboard Tour titles, six Grand Prix titles, and eight U.S. championships.

In one year alone, she won an Olympic gold medal, an X Game gold, the U.S. Open championship, and the Overall Grand Prix title.

In short, she is the most dominant athlete in the history of snowboarding and the most “medaled” halfpipe specialist ever, male or female.

That’s not all. At age 33, she’s still at it—ranked second in the world—while three top-10 rivals are half her age.

This is a story of how Kelly Clark reached the top and how she plans to stay there, with the help of Steadman Clinic doctors and SPRI research, by overcoming a career-threatening injury.

RIGHT PLACE, EARLY START, SUPPORTIVE PARENTS

“I grew up in a small town in Vermont and my dad was a skier,” she explains. “He had me on skis when I was two, and I started snowboarding when I was seven.”

She was competing by the time she got to high school and enrolled in the Mount Snow Academy, a school that allowed students to attend classes half a day and snowboard the other half. By age 16 she had made the U.S. Snowboard Team.  At 18, she won her Olympic gold medal in Salt Lake City.

“I started snowboarding before it was cool. It has elements of creativity and individuality. Two people can do the same trick, but it looks different because each one brings his or her own style to it. In that regard, snowboarding is unique.”

“I also had ‘a moment’ when I was 14,” she told CNN. “That was the first year the Olympics included snowboarding as a sport. I recorded the snowboarding events from Nagano, Japan, on VHS tape and watched them after school. I knew then that’s what I wanted to do with my life.”

Her parents were supportive, but she was on the clock. “Basically, I had one year after high school to show them I could make this a career, and that year turned out to be a breakout season when I started getting first place finishes. Even then, it wasn’t a sure thing until I had that Olympic experience and snowboarding kind of blew up around the world.”

FOUR YEARS FOR 30 SECONDS

“Basically, I train four years for a 30-second halfpipe run,” she says.  “Snowboarders have a very small amount of time to be excellent. At the end of the day, no one can do what we try to do. My sports psychologist says it’s 95 percent physical and five percent mental, but that five percent can completely erase the 95 percent if you let it.”

“It may look like we’re making it up, but every single trick is pre-planned,” she continues. “I know the kind of run I want to make in the Olympics two years out and work toward that goal.”

Off the snow, Kelly trains six days a week, with a two-week break in the spring.  “There are building weeks and recovery weeks,” she says, “with two days of agility drills, two strength days, four days of cardio, and five days of core and mobility training. Getting ready for the Olympics involves about 25 hours of training a week just on fitness, not snowboarding.”

“At my age, I tend to pace myself in practice at events more than before, and try to train smarter, not harder. I want my best runs of the day to be when the judges are watching.”

Clark’s remarkable success has led the U.S. Snowboard Team to study her as a possible prototype in order to gather data on what it takes to be successful in such a demanding sport.

“There really isn’t much data because snowboarding is still a relatively new sport,” she explains. “We don’t know what kind of body type, body composition, and mental makeup is best for us. Now, we’re trying to figure it out.”

“I KNEW IMMEDIATELY THAT SOMETHING WAS WRONG”

"I had been aware that I didn’t have the mobility in my hips that I had when I was younger, but it wasn’t really a concern. But about a year ago I started getting much more limited motion and discomfort in my glutes and lower back. It gradually got worse and I kind of limped my way through the season.”

“I crashed in Norway at the X Games and knew immediately that something was wrong with my hip. I returned to the U.S. and saw Dr. Hackett at The Steadman Clinic in Vail. He was our team doctor and familiar with my medical history. He sent images of my hip to Dr. Marc Philippon, and within days I was back in Vail for surgery on a hip labral tear (ring of cartilage around the hip joint socket), cam impingement (bone tissue overgrowth on the femur), and hamstring avulsion (tendon torn away from the bone).”

“I had a friend who had similar surgery a few years earlier,” says Clark. “I was amazed at how much development in the procedure and rehab protocol had taken place in that short amount of time. The doctors at The Clinic and SPRI are constantly finding better ways to perform the procedures and to speed up recovery.”

Her rehab exercises began at 7:00 am the morning after her surgery, a practice pioneered by SPRI’s Dr. Richard Steadman four decades ago. The recovery/rehabilitation protocols are constantly being refined as a result of research conducted at SPRI.

“Looking at my scars, it seems like Dr. Philippon gets in and out quickly and efficiently. No extra time on the operating table or moving instruments around unnecessarily that can lead to excessive scar tissue. That makes a big difference in the recovery process.”

SEVEN MONTHS, SURGERY TO SLOPES

Clark’s surgery was on March 14. She was cleared to resume all activities in late August and scheduled to return to snow in New Zealand on October 10. Seven months, surgery to slopes. Her goal is to make the Olympic team a year from now.

“I want to be able to enjoy my next two years and make another Olympic run,” she says. “My decision to go ahead with surgery was not only because I wanted to compete again, but to have a good quality of life when I’ve finished competing.”

“I would tell people who have similar injuries, whether or not they are athletes, that I wouldn’t go anywhere else in the world for treatment. You want to be in the best place with the best people who will do anything they can to help you get better, quicker.”

#####

The Kelly Clark Foundation

Kelly Clark lives her message of inspiration through The Kelly Clark Foundation, which gives opportunities to young people and helps them reach their highest potential through snowboarding. Since the organization’s inception six years ago, her foundation has awarded more than $125,000 in grants and scholarships to eliminate financial barriers for talented young athletes across the country.   

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Iris

June 08, 2016

Kelly Clark has had a heck of a winter. After a crash at the X Games in Norway, she went on to compete at the Burton US Open with a hip injury and a hamstring that was detached from the bone. Despite all odds, she landed third place in the Women’s Halfpipe Finals. Then it was time to heal: This meant hip surgery, intense physical therapy, and a six-month recovery period. 

In her 17 years of competitive snowboarding, Kelly says this is her first major injury, and the one that’s impacted her lifestyle and schedule the most. But, as they say, all clouds have a silver lining. This unexpected pause in her busy schedule became a perfect time to raise the puppy that she’s always wanted.

We had a chance to talk to Kelly about her recovery and her new pup, Iris.

So, Iris. How old is she?

Iris is the best. She's just about four months old. She might get her own Instagram account soon, she’s in high demand.

Having the right mentality is a huge part of your career, and you’re going through this challenge that you knew wouldn’t be easy. How did you prepare for that?

My family bred golden retrievers growing up and I’ve wanted to get a dog for like 10 years, but my schedule hasn’t facilitated it.

A few years ago, I moved up to Sacramento and my housing situation up there is much better suited for a pup, as far as having a roommate and a fenced in yard, and things like that. I just thought “Oh, I’m getting to a point in life where I could actually make this happen.” After everything with my hip, I thought, “Now I actually can!” I’m off snow for five to six months and won’t be traveling until next winter. All of a sudden, I had this block of time at home that I’ve never had before.

It was just really good timing for me. I have a busy schedule, but getting a dog wasn’t just about my schedule...  

Click Here to read the full article from Burton and see more posts from Kelly & other Burton Girls

      World, meet Iris. Iris, meet world.

      World, meet Iris. Iris, meet world.

Girls Sports Month: Olympic snowboarder Kelly Clark on longevity, next generation and learning new tricks

Kelly Clark celebrates after the ladies’ halfpipe finals of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games (Photo: Nathan Bilow, USA TODAY Sports)

Kelly Clark celebrates after the ladies’ halfpipe finals of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games (Photo: Nathan Bilow, USA TODAY Sports)

Kelly Clark hasn’t done it by herself, but the veteran snowboarder has had a lot to do with snowboarding’s progression from ski resort outcasts to one of the most popular in the Olympics.

To be sure, her wins have helped. At 32, she is the winningest snowboarder ever with more than 70 trips atop the podium. That includes an Olympic gold medal she won in Salt Lake City in 2002 when she was 18. She followed that up with bronze in 2010 and 2014. Clark also has 13 X Games medals.

And in a sport that values progression, Clark has helped lead the way. She was the first woman to land a 1080 when she did it in 2011.

Hoping her ceiling can be the next generation’s floor, the four-time Olympian is still competing at a high level while mentoring other riders informally and through the Kelly Clark Foundation. Coming off a Grand Prix win in Mammoth in January, she spoke with USA TODAY Sports before the X Games.

As part of USA TODAY High School Sports’ ongoing coverage of Girls Sports Month, Clark reflected on how snowboarding has changed for girls and how she helped get the sport to where it is today.

USAT: When you were first starting in the sport, what was it like for girls?

Kelly Clark: It wasn’t accepted for really anyone, much less women. The first year snowboarding was even allowed at my home resort, snowboarding, I like to say, wasn’t cool then, wasn’t as widely accepted. You were like the outlier of the outlier as a woman, and I was a 7-year-old. I just grew up snowboarding is pretty much how it was.

RELATED: Coverage of Girls Sports Month

USAT: You’ve certainly been part of it, but how have you seen that change since then?

KC: I think there was women who went before me, and myself along with my peers – like Hannah (Teter) and Gretchen (Bleiler) and Torah (Bright) and Elena (Hight) – those were a lot of the names that I really ran with in the competitive world. We saw the biggest surge forward in the acceptance of snowboarding at the 2002 Olympics. Between the Olympics and the X Games, it brought snowboarding into people’s living rooms all across the U.S., all across the world for that matter. And that’s when it kind of became, I don’t want to say accepted, but that’s kind of when it became recognized as a legitimate activity, sport. It’s really grown from then.

I think having events showcase snowboarding really made an invitation to youth and to women. I think seeing the competitive sports world really was the cornerstone of that invitation, for sure. I think it’s just grown in popularity as a result.

RELATED: Carli Lloyd becomes international role model

USAT: It’s not often that you have a sport change so much in the career of an athlete. Why do you think it went from, ‘We don’t even want you on our mountain’ when you were starting to now that they can’t add enough of these events in the Olympics?

KC: Nobody likes change in the first place, so regardless if something was good or bad I think the idea of change in the ski industry was intimidating. But I think snowboarding, and action sports for that matter, are really relatable. They’re called lifestyle sports.

If you go out and play baseball, play catch with your dad, you don’t call yourself a baseball player. But if you go snowboarding with your friends on the weekend, you call yourself a snowboarder. So there’s this sort of inclusion and this identity that comes along with this sport specifically that I think is what made it so successful. It’s not something you do. It’s something you’re a part of. That’s really what makes action sports different than traditional sports. It’s the culture and the lifestyle that goes along with it, and that’s, I believe, what’s made it so successful.

Kelly Clark (Photo: Andrew P. Scott, USA TODAY Sports)

Kelly Clark (Photo: Andrew P. Scott, USA TODAY Sports)

USAT: At what point did you recognize or accept your place as a role model?

KC: When I was 18 and I deferring from college and I had one year to show my dad that I could make snowboarding a career because it was not something you tell your dad that you’re gonna not go to school. And I remember that was really the year that I realized I had made it or I could call this a career.  I won the X Games, the U.S. Open and the Olympics all in the same season, and that was really the moment where I realized that I could do this.

But at the same time, I was young. I was 18 years old. I don’t think it was until, honestly, until my 2010 Olympics where I really had matured enough as a person and grown up enough to really realize that not only was I a leader in this sport, but I was an influencer and I had the opportunity to shape it and contribute. And I think that just comes with experience and maturity. It’s when I finally stopped thinking about myself so much and considering others. You do that right around when you’re 25, 26. You realize you’re not the center of the universe.

RELATED: Tamika Catchings on his illustrious career and life after hoops

USAT: When you look at where things are now for a 7-year-old girl or someone like (15-year-old X Games champion) Chloe Kim or some of these younger pros, what challenges and opportunities are there for girls in this sport?

KC: I think there’s a lot more opportunity for young women than there was when I started in terms of access and maybe inspiration you can relate to. There’s women being profiled at the X Games that are relatable. I think it’s good having people both like Chloe and like myself. We both are relatable to different people. I think it’s great for the sport to have a young teenager in the mix and then someone who’s 30-something in the mix as well.

As far as challenges, we’ve come so far but even last week there was an event in Switzerland that didn’t have equal prize money for men and women which is just kind of amazing in this day and age. You look at that and you’re like, ‘Wait, that’s still happening? How is that even possible?’ We’re established, and we have each other to relate to, to encourage, to inspire, but I wouldn’t say that we’re free and clear of all the kind of gender inequalities.USAT: In your sport, what does it take to keep pushing that and make progress in areas where there might be some inequality?

KC: I think that as women in perhaps careers, other sports, in snowboarding, I think we can get into a position where we feel like we need to not be us and we just need to progress to where men are. And I don’t know if that’s always the answer as far as what kind of challenges we come up against right now as women in snowboarding. I don’t think we need to try to be the men. I think we need to be comfortable in where we’re at and be comfortable in who we are and what we bring to the table and who we’re supposed to be.

I think we spend a lot of time just chasing down men’s progression of snowboarding, and I don’t know if that’s realistic and I don’t know if that’s healthy. I think that’s relatable in business and a lot of different things. There’s aspects and elements that only women can bring to the table that need to be recognized and we need to be comfortable in and we need to be authentic in, not compromising who we are to get our needs met.

Kelly Clark reacts to her first place finish in the Women’s Halfpipe Final at the 2016 U.S. Snowboarding Grand Prix (Photo: Sean M. Haffey, Getty Images)

Kelly Clark reacts to her first place finish in the Women’s Halfpipe Final at the 2016 U.S. Snowboarding Grand Prix (Photo: Sean M. Haffey, Getty Images)

USAT: I know you take being a role model seriously, and your foundation’s a part of that. Either through what you do there or just trying to guide and be a good example for women in the sport, how do you think you’ve been able to do that and why has it been so important to you?

KC: In 2010 is really when I realized that I wanted to make sure that snowboarding was a better place because I was a part of it. I’d had a very long, successful career and I realized that I wanted to leave something more than just competition results. Those come and go, but there’s things that you can build that outlast your ability to perform, and that’s what I wanted to do. That’s what I aim to do through my foundation.

Just for example, one of the women that we support is competing here at X Games now. Maddie Mastro, she’s one of the young student-athletes we support through the Mammoth scholar program through my foundation. We supported her last year and this year, and so it’s really amazing to see when you give people opportunity what they can do with that. That’s just one of the success stories you can point out in the difference that I’m making.

And I’ve always wanted to lead by example, and I want to contribute but I also want to be an athlete that invests in other people. Even for my fellow athletes to see that it’s super important. Our jobs almost require us to prioritize ourselves and our goals and our schedule and our contests, and I just think it’s a bit healthier when we have the balance of pursuing our goals but also considering others along the way and investing into others.

It’s been a big important part of my career because caring about people and investing in others is something I believe in. If my actions didn’t support that, I might want to go back to the drawing board. If that’s something I say I believe in and I believe to be true and I believe is important, I should have a foundation. I should be out there helping people with their tricks. I should be encouraging the women around me. I want to lead by example.

Any time you see such a generation gap – last week, the two women I was on the podium with, if you added up their ages, I was still older. There’s a pretty big gap, and there really is a different generation and a different idea. But I want to make sure that the principles that was inspired by – as far as community and individualism and excellence and camaraderie – that those things remain intact.

Those are the kind of core values of snowboarding. For me, I want to pass those on to this generation of snowboarders. I don’t want that to be lost in the mix of a different generation, of an instant generation where we lose the value of hard work. Maybe it’s part of getting old, something my dad would say. But those are the things that you want to instill, but that’s my opportunity and my responsibility to pass on to the next generation. So not only am I want to do it from a trick perspective, I want to do it from a core value of our community perspective. And I think that’s part of what expires me to really think about others and contribute to the sport of snowboarding.

Kelly Clark (Photo: Sean M. Haffey, Getty Images)   USAT: You’re not done, but there’s a generation coming up behind you that includes riders like Chloe Kim and Arielle Gold. When you look at the state of snowboarding now and what they can bring to it and carry forward, how do you feel about where it is what women like them could do for the sport? KC: It’s exciting. Even sitting in practice last night at X Games, I mentioned to someone at the top, I was like, ‘It’s amazing because everybody’s got something so different to bring to the table’ as far as tricks go and as far as relatability and personality. I felt like it’s a really well-rounded group of women. Seeing what they’re doing makes me think I did a good job. I’m like, ‘OK, they’re gonna go further than me. I did it right.’ After the U.S. Open last year I got asked a lot, ‘Why are you still here? What do you still want to accomplish?’ And it caused me to really reflect on what I do want to accomplish. It stopped being about accomplishing things a long time ago for me. If it was about winning things, I most likely should have stopped a long time ago. That has not been my sole reward and focus in the later part of my career. I’m still here because I believe I have something left to contribute and I believe I haven’t hit my potential. Those are the two things that continue to keep me motivated. I believe that I’ve got things to learn and I’m going to get better at snowboarding, and once I hit my potential, that’s probably when I’ll step back. USAT: Anything you’d like to add? KC: I think it’s super important to figure out who you are apart from what you do. As a young athlete, there’s a million different pressures and expectations from sponsors, family, you name it. And I think it’s super important to develop a sense of significance outside of performance. I’ve been able to do this for so long and be kind of an anomaly in the sport, I think, for length of career, and I’ve really found that burnout doesn’t come from too much activity. It comes from unmet expectations. And I think it’s, I would encourage young women to really develop who they are and have a good idea of what they want to accomplish regardless of what’s going on around them. Because if you don’t develop that, you become reactionary and you become kind of at the mercy of what goes on around you. And having that has allowed me to not look to how I finish to define me. And it’s allowed me to be successful and dream really big and go for it and miss my dreams and still get up the next day and go out and enjoy what I do and dare to dream again. Click here to be taken to the original article 

Kelly Clark (Photo: Sean M. Haffey, Getty Images)

 

USAT: You’re not done, but there’s a generation coming up behind you that includes riders like Chloe Kim and Arielle Gold. When you look at the state of snowboarding now and what they can bring to it and carry forward, how do you feel about where it is what women like them could do for the sport?

KC: It’s exciting. Even sitting in practice last night at X Games, I mentioned to someone at the top, I was like, ‘It’s amazing because everybody’s got something so different to bring to the table’ as far as tricks go and as far as relatability and personality. I felt like it’s a really well-rounded group of women. Seeing what they’re doing makes me think I did a good job. I’m like, ‘OK, they’re gonna go further than me. I did it right.’

After the U.S. Open last year I got asked a lot, ‘Why are you still here? What do you still want to accomplish?’ And it caused me to really reflect on what I do want to accomplish. It stopped being about accomplishing things a long time ago for me. If it was about winning things, I most likely should have stopped a long time ago. That has not been my sole reward and focus in the later part of my career. I’m still here because I believe I have something left to contribute and I believe I haven’t hit my potential. Those are the two things that continue to keep me motivated. I believe that I’ve got things to learn and I’m going to get better at snowboarding, and once I hit my potential, that’s probably when I’ll step back.

USAT: Anything you’d like to add?

KC: I think it’s super important to figure out who you are apart from what you do. As a young athlete, there’s a million different pressures and expectations from sponsors, family, you name it. And I think it’s super important to develop a sense of significance outside of performance. I’ve been able to do this for so long and be kind of an anomaly in the sport, I think, for length of career, and I’ve really found that burnout doesn’t come from too much activity. It comes from unmet expectations.

And I think it’s, I would encourage young women to really develop who they are and have a good idea of what they want to accomplish regardless of what’s going on around them. Because if you don’t develop that, you become reactionary and you become kind of at the mercy of what goes on around you. And having that has allowed me to not look to how I finish to define me. And it’s allowed me to be successful and dream really big and go for it and miss my dreams and still get up the next day and go out and enjoy what I do and dare to dream again.

Click here to be taken to the original article